Skills & Concepts: 1st – 3rd Grades

1st Grade


English/Reading/Writing

  • Recognizes the features of a sentence. (For example: first words, capitalization, and ending punctuation.) – sentence structure
  • Apply appropriate capitalization – first word in sentence, names of people
  • Apply appropriate punctuation: end punctuation
  • Apply knowledge of revision skills
  • Recognizes the spelling and sound of two letters that represent one sound. For example, th, ch, wh. (These are also known as digraphs.)
  • Apply phonics skills to read/understand words/text.
  • Learns to read regularly spelled one-syllable words.
  • Understands how an “e” at the end of a word changes a vowel within the word.
  • Breaks up longer words into syllables in order to read them.
  • Reads grade-level words that have “irregular” spellings.
  • Knows the difference between and reads fiction and non-fiction texts with purpose and an understanding of the plot and important ideas and characters.
  • Talks about and answer questions about the text he reads.
  • Reads texts aloud at an appropriate speed and with expression.
  • Compares different characters, events or texts.
  • Understands the purpose of and uses common features in a book, such as headings, tables of contents and glossaries.
  • Begins to read (grade appropriate) poetry and identifies words and phrases that relate to emotions and the senses.
  • Begins to show literacy appreciation
  • Writes a variety of texts including, opinion pieces, narratives, and explanatory/informational pieces.
  • Writes with structure including an introductory sentence, supporting or accurate details and some sense of closure.
  • Begins to use digital tools, including computers, to practice and “publish” writing. 

Sample Activities

  • Play Time: Read aloud a favorite story or poem as though it is a play or using different voices for the character and the narrator, to help your child practice her pacing and expression. Your child can also read a book to you!
  • Read and Draw: Ask your child to draw a picture of her favorite scene, character or page from a book. She can then write a description of what she drew and why she chose to draw it.
  • Become Poets: Find small and simple poems. Read them together and talk about the feelings they convey. Try making up your own poems together about objects, people you know or anything you like!
  • Word Games: Use magnetic letters, letter tiles or cards from games to create both real and silly words. Practice building longer words by putting together shorter sounds and words.
  • Create Your Own Dictionary: As your child learns to read new words and learns the meaning of new words, keep track of them in your own dictionary. Your child can write them down, draw a picture to illustrate the word and or its definition, or write a sentence with the word. 
  • Write Your Own Stories: After you experience something together or your child has an important moment or event, he can write a about it and illustrate it as though it is a story and share it with your family and friends.
  • Answer a Question: When your child asks a question, research the answer together using books or computers (under your supervision). Then create an informative poster or collage which tells the question the answer and uses both texts and illustrations to show what you learned.
  • Make a Family Magazine or Book: Your child can illustrate a book using drawings and text to describe different family members or friends. Each person can have their own page.
  • Write Cards and Letters for Special Events: On birthdays and holidays your child can send people cards or letters he writes.


Math

  • Adds and subtracts numbers 1-20, solves word problems by using objects, drawings and traditional equations with the plus and minus signs.
  • Adds 3 numbers that add to a number up to 20.
  • Solves addition and subtraction problems by adding up or subtracting smaller numbers, for example 10+4 = 10+2+2 and 15-6= 15-2-2-2.
  • Learns the relationship between addition and subtraction, for example 2+3=5 and 5-3=2.
  • Counts out and groups objects in order to solve single digit addition and subtraction problems.   
  • Counts and writes the numbers 1 to 120, starting from any number less than 120.
  • Understands and creates numbers using 10 as a base, for example, 12 = 1 ten and 2 1’s. 
  • Compares two 2 digit numbers using the <, >, and = signs.
  • Adds up to100 using objects and the concept of 10’s.
  • Subtracts or adds 10 to a 2 digit number in her mind, without counting, and subtracts by 10 from numbers 1-90, using concrete objects or tools.
  • Orders three objects by length.
  • Begins to tell and write time using both digital and analog clocks.
  • Understands data, specifically, the total number of data points, how many are in each category and how many more or less there are in a category.
  • Understands the definition of and difference between shapes and creates shapes using this knowledge.
  • Creates 2 and 3 dimensional shapes.
  • Breaks up circles and rectangles into two and four equal parts, and understands that the parts are halves, fourths, and quarters, and that smaller parts make up larger ones.      

NUMBER SENSE & OPERATIONS

  • Name, model, write, compare, and order numbers to 200; identify place value and odd/even; skip count.
  • Identify and model fractions (halves, thirds, fourths) as parts of wholes/groups.
  • Identify coins and $1 bills; find value of collection of coins.
  • Know addition and subtraction facts through 10; model, create, and solve addition and subtraction problems.

PATTERNS, RELATIONS & ALGEBRA

  • Identify, create, describe, and extend simple rhythmic, shape, size, number, color, and letter patterns; skip count by 2s, 5s, 10s .
  • Construct and solve addition and subtraction sentences.

GEOMETRY

  • Identify, draw, describe, and compare 2-D and 3-D shapes.

MEASUREMENT

  • Identify parts of the day, week, and month; tell time to half hour.
  • Measure objects and use appropriate measurement tools; make and use estimates.
  • Compare and order objects by length and weight

DATA ANALYSIS, PROBABILITY, & STATISTICS

  • Gather, organize, represent, and interpret data using tallies, charts, pictographs, and bar graphs.
  • Decide most likely outcomes.

Sample Activities

  • Add It Up and Shop: When you are in the store together, ask your child to add together different things, for example, how many fruits you bought, how many boxes of something or how many different types of fruit and vegetables.
  • Greater or Less Than? Make three cards, one with the <, one with > sign and one with an = sign. Then play a game in which you put down 2 numbers (also on papers). Ask your child to put the correct sign between the numbers and do this is as fast as possible, seeing how many rounds he can get correct in a certain amount of time. Track how many your child got right and ask him to beat his record another time in the future.
  • Build Things: Use blocks or other building toys to construct houses, towers, vehicles etc. As you build, count pieces by tens, add and subtract pieces and pay attention to the different shapes you use.
  • Take a Poll: Ask family members a question and create a graph of the answers using numbers and pictures. Ask your child questions about the different “data” you collected.
  • Order Up: Compare the sizes of different objects. Ask your child which object is larger, smaller and smallest. Ask your child to order some of his toys in size order. Time him to see how fast he can do this!
  • Set the Table: Setting the table for meals can include lots of math as you and your child add the total numbers of utensils, plates, chairs, etc. 


Science

  • Explores and experiments with the world around him/her and with objects provided by the teacher.
  • Learns new facts about a variety of topics including: the human body, ocean and sea life, animals, measurement, electricity and magnetism and sound and matter (the difference between solids, gases and liquids.)
  • Makes observations and records what he/she sees and learns using graphs, pictures and words.
  • Uses his/her 5 senses to observe and learn about objects. 

EARTH SCIENCE:

  • Recognize that living organisms are found on the earth’s surface.
  • Describe air as a mixture of gases and wind as moving air.
  • Describe weather changes from day to day and over the seasons; identify factors that affect weather; describe how plants and animals adjust to seasonal weather changes.

LIFE SCIENCE:

  • Differentiate between plants and animals; classify and group plants and animals by one characteristic; identify similar parts of different plants.
  • Identify what plants and animals need to survive; identify ways their habitats provide for their basic needs.
  • Describe animal interactions with the environment.

PHYSICAL SCIENCE:

  • Classify solids and liquids by using the sense.
  • Classify and sort objects that re attracted by and not attracted by magnets.
  • Understand that matter can change (e.g. water as a va- por, liquid, or solid).

ENGINEERING/TECHNOLOGY 

  • Describe how a magnetic force makes objects move.
  • Identify tools/machines used for specific purpose (e.g. magnetic compass).

Sample Activities

  • Experiment with Water: Put different objects in water and see what floats and sinks. Heat water up (under your supervision) and see what happens when water boils. Put cups of water in the freezer and refrigerator and compare what happens. Ask your child what he thinks will happen before you do each of these things and talk about what he learns.  Make ice cubes out of water and then watch them melt, focusing on how different matter can change from one thing to another.
  • Observe Your World: Observe things around you — your pet, a rainstorm, a bug outside or anything else in nature. Together, write down and draw pictures of what you notice. Use this to further your child’s interest. Ask her what else she wants to learn about a topic, then read books or look up facts online about that topic. Try to find answers to your child’s questions about an object.
  • Use Your Senses: Help your child use his senses. Blindfold your child and have him taste, touch and smell different objects. Ask him to guess what the object is or talk about how the object tastes, feels and smells. 


Social Studies

  • Learns and talks about his own family, different types of families in the present and in history, and his community.
  • Uses and studies maps to locate his own community as well as others.
  • Develops communication and conversation skills.
  • Creates both group and individual work to represent what he has learned, using writing, illustrations and graphic organizers such as Venn diagrams and T-charts.
  • Begins to explore the role of technology and media.
  • Gains an understanding of the importance of rules, citizenship and democracy in the classroom and in his community.
  • Learns about national holidays and important events and days.
  • Discuss events with a basic understanding of chronology
  • Identify and discuss basic needs for goods and services
  • Identify the symbols, icons, and traditions of the United States
  • Describe the life stories of notable individuals in United States History
  • Identify and discuss the concepts of direction and basic geographic landforms

Sample Activities

  • Study Your Community: Walk around your local neighborhood and take pictures of, draw pictures of and help your child write about what she notices. Encourage your child to talk to different people in the community and ask them questions. Then make a poster or short book about your town. Your child can then send this info to a friend or family member who lives somewhere else.
  • Take a trip: Compare your own town and community to ones around you. If you live in a city, visit a more rural or suburban area. If you live in a rural area or suburb, visit a city. Talk about the differences and similarities or make a chart of them.
  • Act it Out: Use role play to help your child work on his conflict resolution skills. Act out small situations of conflict such as: what happens if someone is playing with a toy you want or what happens if you don’t agree with someone about something. Help your child figure out specific strategies he can use in different situations.
  • Make a Group Plan: Work with other family members or friends on a specific task such as cleaning up a yard or room, or cooking or setting up a meal or party. Assign everyone specific roles and figure out how to work together in the best way possible. 


2nd Grade


English/Reading/Writing

  • Decode using multiple strategies
  • Demonstrate phonics skills to extend understanding
  • Reads more complex words such as two syllable words.
  • Reads words with common prefixes and suffixes. For example: pre, re, un and able, ad, and er.
  • Reads grade appropriate irregularly spelled words. (Consult your child’s teacher for a specific list of these words).
  • Reads a variety of texts including fiction, non-fiction, fables and poetry.
  • Understands the structure of a story and specifically the purpose of a beginning (introducing the text) and ending (concluding the text).
  • Understands the most important details of a text: it’s main purpose and the “who”, “what,” “where,” “when,” “why,” and “how” of a text.
  • Talks about characters’ responses, main events, the lessons in texts, and important ideas or concepts.
  • Begins to make connections within and between texts.
  • Compares at least two different versions of the same story such as, two versions of classic fairy tale.
  • Reads at grade-level with correct accuracy, pace, expression and comprehension.
  • Self-corrects mistakes and re-reads when necessary.
  • Apply appropriate usage/grammar: subject-verb agreement; kinds of sentences
  • Apply appropriate capitalization: first word, names, proper nouns
  • Apply appropriate punctuation: end, comma, quotations marks
  • Demonstrate knowledge of spelling (conventional): from temporary to correct spelling
  • Construct and apply vocabulary/word meaning/ context clues
  • Write a variety of genres: fiction/nonfiction
  • Construct multiple kinds of writing: e.g., essay, poetry, description, narration, opinion, informative, etc.
  • Interpret and respond to literature orally, in writing, projects, media
  • Demonstrate critical reading skills through evaluating and interpreting
  • Demonstrate revision skills in writing
  • Develop oral language: presentation
  • Improve handwriting skills: letter formation, spacing, cursive
  • Uses digital tools (with the aid of the teacher) to publish his writing.
  • Researches topics for research and writing projects

Sample Activities

  • Make a “W” Chart: While you and your child read books together, or while your child reads a book by herself, make a “W” chart. Fill out the who, what, where, why and how of the book as they are learned.
  • Pay Attention to Prefixes and Suffixes: When you or child uses a word with a prefix or suffix stop to talk about it. Break down the word and talk about what the suffix and the root word mean together. Think of other words that have that suffix or prefix. You can also write the word out on two separate cards, with the prefix on one and the root word on the other and make new words with the cards. Write down the different words with prefixes and suffixes you and your child use.
  • Make Up Your Own Version of a Story: After your child reads a story, make your own version of the story, changing details such as setting, time, or even a new ending. You can change the story so it occurs in places or with characters you know. This helps your child understand story structure and make comparisons. Or, make up your own version of a fairy tale or known story.
  • Play Time: Act out a favorite picture book or part from a chapter book. Use the book as a script, playing the different characters and narrators. You can even put on a performance for friends and family. 
  • Keep a Journal: Keep a family journal of trips, weekends and special times spent together. Your child can both write and illustrate the journal.  Pick a favorite entry from the journal and use it to expand your child’s writing. You and your child can write a longer piece or story about that event and illustrate it with photographs or drawings.
  • Research and Report: Pick a topic your child is passionate about and research it. Go to the library or look online together for information on that topic. Then work together to create an informative collage, magazine or article about that topic, using illustrations or photographs from magazines or online.
  • Write What You Think: Kids have very strong opinions! Ask your child to express her opinion about something through writing and be sure to explain reasons why she thinks this. Your child can then read the piece out loud to family members and take questions from the “audience.”
  • Read Other People’s Writing: Second grade is a great time for your child to start reading magazines made especially for kids such as Scholastic News. These often have many types of texts including narratives, fiction and non-fiction and opinion pieces.  Read the magazines together and talk about the articles. Reading these pieces will help your child become a better writer. 


Math

  • Adds and subtracts numbers from 1-20 using mental strategies and ultimately, by the end of the year, adds two 1 digit numbers from memory.
  • Solves one and two-step addition and subtraction problems with numbers up to 100, using drawings and equations and explaining the process.
  • Learns the difference between odd and even numbers.
  • Begins learning the foundations of multiplication by adding the same number to itself, (for example, 4+4) and grouping together the same number of objects to add up to more.
  • Understands and can break down a 3-digit number into groups of hundreds, tens and ones.
  • Reads, writes and counts up to 1000, including being able to count by 5’s 10’s and 100’s.
  • Compares 3-digit numbers, using the signs: >, < and =.
  • Practices adding together up to four 2-digit numbers by skip counting and adding smaller part of the numbers together.
  • Measures objects and uses different units of measurement. (For example, inches and centimeters.)
  • Estimates an object’s measurement and measures how much longer one object is than another.
  • Tells time using analog and digital clocks.
  • Begins to solve world problems involving money.
  • Creates picture and bar graphs, and answers questions about the data represented in the graphs.
  • Recognizes triangles, quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, and cubes and their defining characteristics, such as the number of angles and faces.
  • Breaks up shapes into halves, thirds and fourths and uses smaller shapes to create larger ones.

NUMBER SENSE & OPERATIONS

  • Name, model, write, compare, and order numbers to 1000; identify place value and odd/even
  • Identify and model common fractions as parts of wholes/groups and on a number line.
  • Identify value of and represent varying amounts of coins and bills; find value of collection <$5.00.
  • Model, estimate, and solve 3-digit addition and sub- traction problems; fact families to 20.

PATTERNS, RELATIONS & ALGEBRA

  • Identify, create, describe, and extend simple rhythmic, shape, size, number (e.g. 100 chart, addition, subtraction), color, and letter patterns.
  • Construct and solve open number sentence problems: use +, -, >, <, and =.
  • Describe functions (trade coins and measurements).

GEOMETRY

  • Describe attributes of 2-D and 3-D shapes; identify, draw, describe, and compare 2-D shapes; recognize congruence’ describe rotations, reflections, and translations; identify symmetry.

MEASUREMENT

  • Use a calendar; tell time to quarter hour.
  • Measure objects and use appropriate measurement tools; make and use estimates.
  • Compare length, weight, area, and volume of objects.

DATA ANALYSIS, PROBABILITY, & STATISTICS

  • Gather, organize, represent, and interpret data using tallies, charts, pictographs, and bar graphs.
  • Decide most likely outcomes.

Sample Activities

  • Shop and Count: When you are with your child in the store have her help you figure out the math involved in paying. Talk about change received, total money spent or how much money you saved by using a coupon. You can also play “store” at home using real or game money.
  • Find and Build Shapes: When you see objects such as skyscrapers, picture frames, or even book shelves, ask your child to identify the different shapes she sees in it. Create your own objects using different shapes.
  • Make a Measure Treasure Hunt: Ask your child to measure different objects in the house. You can make this into a treasure hunt. Ask her to find two objects that are the same length, objects that are longer or shorter than each other and the longest or shortest object she can find.  She can even measure the people in your family. A tape measure, paper and pencil are all she needs!
  • Time It: Ask your child to time how long it takes her (or another family to do something). Record these times and figure out how much longer one time is than another or help your child break her own record. 


Science

  • Uses observation and experimentation to learn about his/her world.
  • Asks scientific questions and finds the answers to his/her questions.
  • Collects and uses data to support experiments and what he/she learns.
  • Records his/her observations both through writing and talking and uses his/her observations to explain and make conclusions.

EARTH SCIENCE:

  • Recognize that living organisms are found on the earth’s surface.
  • Recognize that fossils provide information about living things that inhabited the earth years before.
  • Compare the characteristics of different types of dinosaurs; describe danger of extinction.

LIFE SCIENCE:

  • Classify objects as living, nonliving, or once living.
  • Describe what living things need to survive; identify ways in which their habitats provide for their basic needs; classify plants and animals by habitats.
  • Identify parts of plants and their functions.
  • Sequence the life cycles of certain plants.

PHYSICAL SCIENCE:

  • Classify and group solid objects by size, shape,
    color, and texture and liquids by color and texture.
  • Classify matter as solid, liquid, or gas; describe properties of each state; recognize that solids have a definite shape and that liquid, or gases take the shape of their container.
  • Describe how water can change state; describe melting, boiling, freezing, condensing, and evaporating.

ENGINEERING/TECHNOLOGY 

  • Identify and describe the safe and proper use of tools and materials.
  • Describe how animals use parts of their bodies as tools for survival.

Sample Activities

  • Compare Textures: Collect different textures from nature such as sticks, leaves, grass, stones and bark. Your child can make a collage out of them or blindfold your child and ask her to use her sense of touch to figure out what it was.
  • Use Your Senses: Go outside into nature and help your child take pictures, videos, draw and write about what she sees, hears, smells and touches. Be sure to focus on one sense at a time, for example have your child close her eyes and ask her to focus on what she hears. Your child can then create a poster, collage or short book of what she learned and observed.
  • Mix It Up: Let your child experiment and mix together different liquids. Add baking soda or baking powder. Have your child record her observations using text and illustrations and write down what she learned. Record differences and findings.
  • Read and Report: Your child can pick a scientific topic she enjoys such as animals, space or the human body. Research the topic together using books and the computer. Your child can then create a collage, short book or informative text about the topic and present it to family members and friends


Social Studies

  • Learns about the history of his community and family.
  • Compares his own community with others, specifically with an appreciation for valuing difference and multiculturalism.
  • Gains a deeper understanding of geography and specifically that of North America, using maps to locate and identify different types of places, such as bodies of water, mountains, the equator, etc.
  • Learns more about government, its roles and how its officials are chosen.
  • Learns about important historical figures.
  • Uses reading, writing and art to deepen his understanding of concepts and portray what he has learned.
  • Learns about American holidays and important days and events.
  • Explain broad concepts of rights, responsibilities and leadership
  • Identify and discuss basic economic principles of buying and selling
  • Discuss events with an evolving understanding of chronology

Sample Activities

  • Compare Your Community: Learn about another community by visiting it or researching it together in books or online. Then make a chart comparing the differences between that community and yours.
  • Find the Historical Figures You Know: You and your child can talk with and interview an older family member or friend about an important or historical moment they experienced. This can be filmed or recorded, or you can even put together a poster or book of what you learned together.
  • Make Your Own Map: Help your child create a map of your home, neighborhood or another important location.


3rd Grade


English/Reading/Writing

  • Reads multi-syllable and grade appropriate, irregularly spelled words.  
  • Reads grade-level text with appropriate pace, accuracy, expression and understanding.
  • Self-corrects mistakes and re-reads when necessary.
  • Use a variety of strategies to decode and comprehend text
  • Use picture clues to comprehend text
  • Apply phonics skills to read/understand words/text.
  • Talks about and answers questions about a text using specific example from the text and connects different parts of a text.
  • Reads a variety of texts including, fiction, non-fiction, fables and poetry and understands and talks about their main ideas and lessons.
  • Begins to understand the difference between literal and non-literal text such as metaphors and analogies.
  • Uses the text and context to determine the meaning of words.
  • Is able to express his/her own point of view about characters or a text.
  • Makes comparisons between books written by the same author and books such as series that are about the same characters.
  • Apply appropriate usage/grammar: sentence structure
  • Apply appropriate capitalization – first word in sentence, names of people
  • Apply appropriate punctuation: end punctuation
  • Apply appropriate spelling: consonant sounds/blends
  • Acquire and apply new vocabulary
  • Writes a variety types of texts including:
    • Opinion Pieces: Students introduce their opinions, state their opinion, provide reasons for their opinion and provide a conclusion.
    • Narrative Pieces: Students write about an event, using descriptive details, feelings and proper order and provide a conclusion.
    •  Informative/Explanatory Pieces: Students introduce a topic and use facts, definitions and if helpful, illustrations to further explain the topic. Students also provide a conclusion.
  • Uses terms such as: because, since, for example, also, another and but to elaborate on and make connections in his writing.
  • Apply knowledge of revision skills – Plans, revises and edits his writing, going through the same process as most writers do.
  • Demonstrate ability to use oral language
  • Show literacy appreciation
  • Demonstrate critical reading: interpretation and evaluation
  • Continued development of handwriting skills: letter formation, spacing
  • Uses digital tools (under the guidance of the teacher) to publish his writing and interact and communicate with others
  • Demonstrate technology skills: simple keyboarding skills, directions.
  • Begins to take notes and do research for short research projects.
  • Spends a variety of time writing a piece, ranging from a short period of time, such as 30 minutes to working on one piece over the course of a few weeks.

Sample Activities

  • Get Serious About Series: Find a series which interests your child and begin to read it together. You can read to your child, your child can read to you, and he can read a chapter independently. You and your child can interview each other as you read chapter-sharing and asking about main ideas, events and ideas you both have about the books and characters.
  • Look It Up: When your child encounters a word she doesn’t know the meaning of, look up the meaning together. You can even begin to keep your own family dictionary, recording words and their definitions. Your child can create illustrations that show definitions of the words, as well. Use the word yourself, or encourage your child to use that word in a sentence sometime during the day.
  • Learn About an Author: As your child develops favorite authors, look online for that author’s website.  Your child can email or write a letter to the author (under your supervision). The author may even be at a book signing or other events in your neighborhood for you and your child to attend. 
  • Write About Your Lives: When your child experiences an enjoyable or important family moment, you and your child can write about it together as a narrative piece. Describe the events that occurred using details and emotion. You can then send the piece to family members or friends to share the event and the writing.
  • Get Technical: Under your supervision, begin to help your child use a computer to research a topic or communicate with friends and family. Your child can also use the computer to write his own pieces or pieces you write together.
  • Learn How to do Something New: Pick something you and your child want to learn about or learn how to do, for example, planting a garden. Research the topic online or in a book together and then create an informative piece, explaining a topic or how to do something. You can then do the project yourselves or teach another family member or friend using the piece you and your child wrote.  
  • Make Your Own Magazine: Read magazines for children, such as Scholastic News, to familiarize your child with the format of magazines. Then work together to create your own magazine about your family, topics of interest, or anything you’d like!


Math

  • Multiplies and divides numbers up to 100 and understands the relationship between multiplication and division.
  • Understands that 3×5=15 and 5×3=15. 
  • Begins to memorize the product of all one digit numbers so that she has memorized them all by the end of 3rd grade.
  • Solves word problems which require two steps and more than one mathematical action. For example: If Scott has 9 cupcakes and 12 candies, how many cupcakes and pieces of candy can he give to 3 people, so that each person has the same amount?
  • Rounds numbers to the nearest tens or hundreds.
  • Adds numbers up to 1,000.
  • Understands and creates fractions and uses number lines to represent and compare different fractions.
  • Solves problems involving time and measurement.
  • Creates and uses graphs to represent data and answer questions.
  • Learns about shapes and specifically quadrilaterals and their features.
  • Learns about and figure out the area of an object using multiplication and addition and specifically by multiplying the lengths of the sides of an object

NUMBER SENSE & OPERATIONS

  • Name, write, model, order, and compare numbers through 9,999; identify the value of the digits.
  • Know and represent multiplication/division facts through 10 x 10.
  • Solve problems involving addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.
  • Identify and represent fractions and mixed numbers; locate and compare fractions on a number line.
  • Recognize classes of numbers such as odd/even.
  • Estimate through rounding and regrouping.

PATTERNS, RELATIONS & ALGEBRA

  • Describe, create, and extend geometric, addition, and subtraction patterns.
  • Write number sentences; find missing parts.

GEOMETRY

  • Describe, model, draw, compare, and classify 2-D shapes; identify and describe simple 3-D shapes.
  • Identify and describe angles and lines.
  • Identify and draw lines of symmetry.
  • Plot ordered pairs.

MEASUREMENT

  • Understand attributes of length, area, and weight; find area and perimeter of rectangles.
  • Select appropriate units of measure; carry out simple conversions.
  • Tell time to nearest minute; use a calendar.

DATA ANALYSIS, PROBABILITY, & STATISTICS

  • Gather, organize, represent, and interpret data using tallies, charts, pictographs, and bar graphs.
  • Find combinations for two sets of objects

Sample Activities

  • Create a Multiplication Collage: Your child can look through magazines and newspapers to find multiple pictures (around 20) of one type of thing, for example, animals with 4 legs, cars and trucks or pairs of things. Then help your child practice her multiplication skills by asking her to group the objects to solve a multiplication problem. She can use the collage to solve the problem and explain how she solved it.    
  • Take a Poll: Ask family members a question and create a graph of the answers using numbers and pictures. Ask your child questions about the different “data” you collected and create a graph based on the data. Your child can then “report” the findings to the family like a news reporter.
  • Cook with Fractions: Make foods such as parfaits, sandwiches, or pizzas using fractions. For example, ask your child to help you make a pizza with 1/4 of a topping.  Or when serving food such as pizza or a pie your child can help you slice it into parts and serve it.
  • Time It: Towards the middle and end of the school year, when your child has become more familiar with multiplication, begin to time how long it takes it for her to do multiplication tables by heart for one number at a time. For example, work on 2, then 3, then 4. Record how long it takes as well as her progress, encouraging her to break her previous records. 


Science

  • Observes living and non-living things and makes inferences about the observations.
  • Researches information on a variety of topics using texts and computers.
  • Collects and uses data to support experiments and what he/she learns.
  • Records his/her observations both through writing and talking and uses his/her observations to explain and make conclusions.
  • Understands what living things need (air, water and food) and what they do (grow, move and reproduce).
  • Studies and observes life cycles.
  • Experiments with different types of materials and different matter such as solid, liquids, and gas.

EARTH SCIENCE:

  • Recognize earth as part of the solar system; describe characteristics of the sun and moon; explain the phases of the moon.
  • Understand that the earth revolves around the sun each year and rotates on its axis every 24 hours; connect this to day/night, movement of sun, moon, and stars across the sky, seasonal changes, and eclipses.

LIFE SCIENCE:

  • Describe parts of seeds, flowers, and plants; explain pollination.
  • Recognize that living things go through predictable life cycles; give examples and describe the major stages of their life cycles.
  • Differentiate between observed characteristics of plants and animals and those that are affected by the environment.

PHYSICAL SCIENCE:

  • Classify objects that transmit heat; describe how heat travels through different types of matter; describe how heat can change states of matter.
  • Identify and give examples of basic forms of energy; explain how energy can be transformed from one form to another.

ENGINEERING/TECHNOLOGY 

  • Identify materials used to accomplish a task based on a specific property (e.g. fibers—insulation).
  • Identify a problem that reflects the need for shelter, storage, or convenience (e.g. energy sources).

Sample Activities

  • Research Your World: Choose something your child likes for example, animals, plants, cooking, weather, and the body. Your child can come up with a list of questions she has about a topic and then work together to find the answers, experiment and observe that topic.
  • Plant Something: Plant something outside or inside and ask your child to observe what she sees, recording the growth and process. Once the plant has grown, help your child identify the different parts of the plants and talk and learn about what those parts do.
  • Move It!: Go outside or stay inside to experiment with motion. Take a variety of objects, for example, a ball, a balloon, a paper airplane or a toy car and have them move in different ways. Slide them down a ramp, hill or stairs, push or throw them with different amounts of force or blow air on them. As your child does this, talk about the different speeds of the objects, what makes them go faster and slower and why this might be.
  • Picture Science: You and your child can take close-up pictures of objects in science such as animal parts, fur, plants, trees, or different materials (wood, rubber, metal).  Then you and your child can use your observation skills to try to guess what the picture is. Make this a game, taking turns guessing what each other’s picture is.
  • Quiz Show: Find either actual objects or pictures of objects which are both “alive” and “not alive.” Show your child one object at a time and ask him to answer “alive” or “not alive.”  Make this feel fast paced and like a quiz show, showing objects quickly and asking your child to answer as quickly as possible. You can even time how long it takes. After a round of play, look at the different objects and talk about the similarities and differences between the alive and non-live objects. 


Social Studies

  • Learns about global and historical communities.
  • Discuss the basic history, geography, economics and government of your local city.
  • Identify and discuss local artifacts and sites as resources in understanding local and state history.
  • Research the life stories of key people in your local city and state.
  • Learns about the connection between a culture and its environment.
  • Studies and uses maps to gain a deeper understanding of geography and how geography affects a community.
  • Learns about basic financial needs, such as how different communities support and sustain themselves.
  • Learns about how different communities govern themselves and their leaders.
  • Compares both the similarities and differences between different cultures with an emphasis on accepting and understanding why these differences exist.
  • Uses graphic organizers and charts to make comparisons between cultures and communities. 
  • Uses different media such as literature, art, writing, film and museum visits to deepen her understanding of concepts and portray what she has learned.
  • Discusses American holidays and important days and events as they approach.

Sample Activities

  • Keep Up with Current Events: Read local newspapers, magazines and websites with your child. Look at the pictures and talk about important events or news. Even if your child doesn’t read the articles, you can summarize the subjects for them.  Magazines made just for kids, such as Scholastic News are also great resources for learning current events.
  • Learn about Your Local Government: Visit your town hall and learn about your local leaders. Your child can write a letter or email to local government leaders. It is sometimes even possible to meet with them.
  • Form a Family Government: Assign different roles to family members, vote on family decisions or rules, or hold meetings to discuss decisions and issues that come up in the family.
  • Pick a Place: Have your child pick a place on the map she would like to learn about. Use the internet and/or books to learn more about the place and its community. Or ask someone you know who lives in a different place to send you pictures of and facts about that place. Then work together with your child to create a collage or magazine about that place using text and art.
  • Find a Pen-Pal: If you know of another child who lives somewhere else, coordinate with a parent to set your children up as pen-pals, using technology (under your supervision), when possible. Your child can use email, letters, and video calling to communicate. Have the children send pictures of their communities to each other.
  • Find the Historical Figures You Know: You and your child can talk with and interview an older family member or friend about an important or historical moment he/she experienced. This can be filmed or recorded, or you can even put together a poster or book of what you learned together.
  • Map It Out: When visiting a new place look at a map and show your child your planned route and important locations on the map. When you are given a map somewhere (such as in an amusement park, department store, zoo or museum), help your child read the map and let her lead the way.