Showing 1–20 of 53 results

  • $3.00

    Twelfth Night, or What You Will is a comedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written around 1601–1602 as a Twelfth Night’s entertainment for the close of the Christmas season. The play centres on the twins Viola and Sebastian, who are separated in a shipwreck. Viola (who is disguised as Cesario) falls in love with Duke Orsino, who in turn is in love with Countess Olivia. Upon meeting Viola, Countess Olivia falls in love with her thinking she is a man.

    Buy Now
  • $3.00

    This large resource (300+ pages) is filled with poems that are sought by teachers to use in the classroom. Poems from authors such as Tennyson, Van Dyke, Shakespeare, Longfellow, Kipling and many more!

    Buy Now
  • $2.50

    This is a downloadable copy of the book.
    About the book: Treasure Island is an adventure novel narrating a tale of “buccaneers and buried gold.” Its influence is enormous on popular perceptions of pirates, including such elements as treasure maps marked with an “X,” schooners, the Black Spot, tropical islands, and one-legged seamen bearing parrots on their shoulders. The story was originally considered a coming-of-age story and is noted for its atmosphere, characters, and action. It is one of the most frequently dramatised of all novels.

    About the Author:  Robert Louis Stevenson (13 November 1850 – 3 December 1894) was a Scottish novelist and travel writer, most noted for Treasure Island, Kidnapped, Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and A Child’s Garden of Verses. A celebrity in his lifetime, Stevenson’s critical reputation has fluctuated since his death, though today his works are held in general acclaim. He is currently ranked as the 26th most translated author in the world.

    Buy Now
  • $3.00

    Pip is a young orphan who wants nothing more than to become a gentleman and be worthy of the beautiful but snobby Estella. So when he receives a large fortune from an unknown benefactor to undergo training, he’s ecstatic and convinced it must be from Miss Havisham, Estella’s strange guardian. However, the culture of wealth breeds changes in Pip that his loyal friends find insulting. It may take the unsavory criminal from Pip’s childhood to help him get his priorities in order and reset his expectations.

    • Interest Level: Grade 5 – Grade 12  ·
    • Reading Level: Grade 9
    Buy Now
  • $2.50

    This is a downloadable copy of the book.
    About the book: Published in 1811, Sense and Sensibility has delighted generations of readers with its masterfully crafted portrait of two sisters, Elinor and Marianne Dashwood. Forced to leave their home after their father’s death, Elinor and Marianne must rely on making good marriages as their means of support.

    About the Author: Jane Austen was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century. Austen’s plots often explore the dependence of women on marriage in the pursuit of favorable social standing and economic security.

    Buy Now
  • $2.50

    This is a downloadable copy of the book.
    About the book: Cooper’s fictitious frontier hero Bumppo is never called by his name, but is instead referred to as “the trapper” or “the old man.” Chronologically The Prairie is the fifth and final installment of the Leatherstocking Tales, though it was published before The Pathfinder (1840) and The Deerslayer (1841). It depicts Natty in the final year of his life still proving helpful to people in distress on the American frontier.

    About the Author: James Fenimore Cooper was an American writer of the first half of the 19th century. His historical romances draw a picture of frontier and American Indian life in the early American days which created a unique form of American literature.

    Buy Now
  • Chasing An Iron Horse ; Or, A Boy's Adventures In The Civil War
    $2.50

    Story-line: The story is about an adolescent drummer boy named George Knight and his dog Waggie during the Civil War. Together this pair joins a group of Union soldiers who make their way deep into southern territory, as spies, to overtake and steal a train. Their intent is to drive the train north, burning railroad bridges on their way back to their own lines. The story addresses courage, honor, dignity between combatants, and ends with a nation re-united.Written in 1902.

    It is based on a true story, that journalizes the penetration, techniques of survival, attack, escape and evasion, and the complete details of the raid. (Suggested for 7th-12th Grades)

    Buy Now
  • $3.00

    This is a downloadable copy of the book.
    About the book: Eight Hundred Leagues on the Amazon  was published in 1881 and has also been published as The Giant Raft.  Unlike many of his other novels, this story does not have any science fiction elements. It is an adventure novel. This novel involves how Joam Garral, a ranch owner who lives near the Peruvian-Brazilian border on the Amazon River, is forced to travel down-stream when his past catches up with him.

    About the Author:  Jules Gabriel Verne was a French novelist, poet, and playwright. Verne is generally considered a major literary author in France and most of Europe, where he has had a wide influence on the literary avant-garde and on surrealism. Verne has been the second most-translated author in the world since 1979, ranking between Agatha Christie and William Shakespeare. He has sometimes been called the “Father of Science Fiction”

    Buy Now
  • $3.00

    This is a downloadable copy of the book.
    About the book: Written in 1897, it is a response to Edgar Allan Poe’s 1838 novel The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket. It follows the adventures of the narrator and his journey from the Kerguelen Islands aboard Halbrane.

    About the Author:  Jules Gabriel Verne was a French novelist, poet, and playwright. Verne is generally considered a major literary author in France and most of Europe, where he has had a wide influence on the literary avant-garde and on surrealism. Verne has been the second most-translated author in the world since 1979, ranking between Agatha Christie and William Shakespeare. He has sometimes been called the “Father of Science Fiction”

    Buy Now
  • $3.00

    This is a downloadable copy of the book.
    About the book: “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” is among the earliest examples of American fiction with enduring popularity, especially during Halloween because of a character known as the Headless Horseman believed to be a Hessian soldier who was decapitated by a cannonball in battle.

    About the Author: Washington Irving as an American short story writer, essayist, biographer, historian, and diplomat of the early 19th century. He is best known for his short stories “Rip Van Winkle” (1819) and “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” (1820). Irving served as ambassador to Spain from 1842 to 1846. He made his literary debut in 1802 with a series of observational letters to the Morning Chronicle, written under the pseudonym Jonathan Oldstyle. He moved to England for the family business in 1815 where he achieved fame with the publication of The Sketch Book of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent., serialized from 1819–20. He continued to publish regularly throughout his life, and he completed a five-volume biography of George Washington just eight months before his death at age 76 in Tarrytown, New York.

    Buy Now
  • $2.50

    This is a downloadable copy of the book.
    About the book: Lady Susan is shortest and least known novel of Austen’s and was written in 1794 but not published until 1875 after her death. It is about the horrible flirt Lady Susan Vernon, a widow in her thirties who has an affair with a married man.

    About the Author: Jane Austen was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century. Austen’s plots often explore the dependence of women on marriage in the pursuit of favorable social standing and economic security.

    Buy Now
  • $2.50

    This is a downloadable copy of the book.
    About the book: Jane Austen was at the height of her artistic powers when she wrote Emma, the fourth and last of her works to be published during her lifetime. The novel is a lively comedy of manners populated by some of Austen’s most entertaining and memorable characters, and it showcases her technical skills as a mature and experimental writer.

    About the Author: Jane Austen was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century. Austen’s plots often explore the dependence of women on marriage in the pursuit of favorable social standing and economic security.

    Buy Now
  • $2.50

    This is a downloadable copy of the book.
    About the book: It is the fourth novel Cooper wrote featuring Natty Bumppo, his fictitious frontier hero, and the third chronological episode of the Leatherstocking Tales. The Pathfinder shows Natty at his old trick of guiding tender damsels through the dangerous woods, and the siege at the blockhouse and the storm on Lake Ontario are considerably like other of Cooper’s sieges and storms. Natty, in this novel commonly called the Pathfinder, keeps in a hardy middle age his simple and honest nature, which is severely tested by his love for a nineteen year old young woman. She is a conventional heroine of romance. A certain soft amiability about her turns for a time all the thoughts of the scout to the world of domestic affections. More talkative than ever before, he reveals new mental and moral traits. With the same touch of realism which had kept Uncas and Cora apart in The Last of the Mohicans, Cooper separates these lovers, and sends Natty’s romantic interest to the arms of a younger suitor, restoring the hero to his home in the wilderness.

    About the Author: James Fenimore Cooper was an American writer of the first half of the 19th century. His historical romances draw a picture of frontier and American Indian life in the early American days which created a unique form of American literature.

    Buy Now
  • $2.50

    This is a downloadable copy of the book.
    About the book: A heartwarming story of a young girl’s struggle to belong and fit in, in the face of adversity, and of her upbringing among strong women, grumpy fishermen, annoying gossips, sea captains, and the dreamlike, tempestuous landscape of Orr’s Island. THE PEARL OF ORR’S ISLAND is one of the forgotten — but not lost — masterpieces of American literature. It reflects Harriet Beecher Stowe’s awareness of the complexity of small-town society, her commitment to realism, and her fluency in the local language.

    About the Author:  Harriet Elisabeth Beecher Stowe (June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896) was an American abolitionist and author. She came from the Beecher family, a famous religious family, and is best known for her novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852), which depicts the harsh conditions for enslaved African Americans. Stowe wrote 30 books, including novels, three travel memoirs, and collections of articles and letters. She was influential for both her writings and her public stances and debates on social issues of the day.

    Buy Now
  • $2.50

    This is a downloadable copy of the book.
    About the book: 15 charming short stories told by ole’ Sam Lawson to entertain Horace and Bill, two impressionable, curious and clever young boys of Oldtown (a fictional 1850’s New England village), during evenings gathered around the hearth, or roaming with Sam around the countryside. Stowe faithfully and masterfully captures many of the colloquial expressions, superstitions, beliefs, customs and habits of the period that have almost completely faded from modern American culture, as well as conveying many truths about the human condition that haven’t changed a bit.

    About the Author:  Harriet Elisabeth Beecher Stowe (June 14, 1811 – July 1, 1896) was an American abolitionist and author. She came from the Beecher family, a famous religious family, and is best known for her novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852), which depicts the harsh conditions for enslaved African Americans. Stowe wrote 30 books, including novels, three travel memoirs, and collections of articles and letters. She was influential for both her writings and her public stances and debates on social issues of the day.

    Buy Now
  • $3.00

    An anthology of poems by English and American poets including Drake, Longfellow, Bryant, Tennyson, Wolfe and many more.

    Buy Now
  • $2.50

    Moby-Dick, written in 1851, recounts the adventures of the narrator Ishmael as he sails on the whaling ship, Pequod, under the command of the monomaniacal Captain Ahab. Melville dedicated the book to fellow Dark Romantic, Nathaniel Hawthorne: “In token of my admiration for his genius, this book is inscribed to Nathaniel Hawthorne.”

    Buy Now
  • $3.00

    This is a downloadable copy of the book. (300 pages)
    About the book: Refusing to be civilized by Southern society or cowed by his drunken father’s lashings, young Huckleberry Finn decides he has only one option left: fake his own death and hop a raft down the Mississippi River. Instead of carrying him far from trouble, though, Huck’s raft delivers him to a place of moral uncertainty.

    Mark Twain unwinds Huck’s harrowing journey to manhood with satirical wit, revealing the troubled history of the American South, where slavery held sway long after the Civil War ended. Huck’s relationship with runaway slave Jim forces him to confront his beliefs about friendship and freedom.

    Interest Level Reading Level
    Grades 7 – 12 Grades 6 – 12
    Buy Now