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    If you are looking for a student centered resource to help students learn and practice research skills, report writing skills, project skills, presentation skills and more this is a great unit. Use it within a Language Arts classroom or a Social Studies / U.S. History classroom. Very flexible and cross-curricular!

     

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    Leander Stillwell was typical of thousands of Northern boys who answered President Lincoln’s call for volunteers. In January 1862, only a few months past his 18th birthday, and only after he and his father had sowed the wheat, gathered the corn and cut the winter firewood, Stillwell left his family’s log cabin in the Jersey County backwoods of western Illinois and enlisted in Company D of the 61st Illinois Infantry Regiment. For three and a half years he served in the Western theater of operations as a noncommissioned officer before being mustered out as a lieutenant in September 1865. His first—and biggest—battle, Shiloh, was the one he remembered most vividly. He also took part in skirmishes in Tennessee and Arkansas, as well as the Siege of Vicksburg. In The Story of a Common Soldier Stillwell tells of his Army experiences, as critic H. L. Mencken observed admiringly in a review, “in plain, straightforward American, naked and unashamed, without any of the customary strutting and bawling.” Small for his age and given to taking solitary walks in the woods beyond the picket lines, Stillwell was nevertheless an enthusiastic and obedient soldier. “Just a little mortifying,” was Stillwell’s reaction when his regiment missed two battles because it had been left to guard a town in Tennessee. But, he hastened to add, “the common soldier can only obey orders, and stay where he is put, and doubtless it was all for the best.”

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    Sojourner Truth was an African-American abolitionist and women’s rights activist. Truth was born into slavery but escaped with her infant daughter to freedom in 1826. After going to court to recover her son in 1828, she became the first black woman to win such a case against a white man.

    If you are looking for a student centered resource to help students learn and practice research skills, report writing skills, project skills, presentation skills and more. Use it within a Language Arts classroom or a Social Studies / U.S. History classroom. Very flexible and cross-curricular!

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    This 109 page Civil War teaching unit takes students through 9 different sections:

    • Disunion
    • Going to War
    • Antietam & Emancipation
    • Life at War
    • The Home Front
    • Shifting Tides of 1863
    • Bringing the War to an End
    • Post War Effects
    • Preserving the Memories

    ** Includes 7 PowerPoints **

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    This 261 page book holds a 1900 copyright and was thought of as the ‘first book on American history used in schools in preparation for… more ‘formal’ textbook learning.’ It is however not for young readers. It is not a textbook but rather reads as an informational book that explains the history of the United States and is best read by 5th -8th graders but can also be used by high school students as a reference as well! It would be a good addition to read along side your normal curriculum.

    See description below for chapter titles.

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    Thomas Wentworth Higginson, a Unitarian minister, was a fervent member of new England’s abolitionist movement, an active participant in the Underground Railroad, and part of a group that supplied material aid to John Brown before his ill-fated raid on Harpers Ferry. When the Civil War broke out, Higginson was commissioned as a colonel of the black troops training in the Sea Islands off the coast of the Carolinas.

    Shaped by American Romanticism and imbued with Higginson’s interest in both man and nature, Army Life in a Black Regiment ranges from detailed reports on daily life to a vivid description of the author’s near escape from cannon fire, to sketches that conjure up the beauty and mystery of the Sea Islands.

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    Frederick Douglass was an American social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman. After escaping from slavery in Maryland, he became a national leader of the abolitionist movement in Massachusetts and New York, gaining note for his oratoryand incisive antislavery writings.
     
    If you are looking for a student centered resource to help students learn and practice research skills, report writing skills, project skills, presentation skills and more this is it! This unit is a notebooking project. It can be assigned individually or within cooperative groups. Use it within a Language Arts classroom or a Social Studies / U.S. History classroom. Very flexible and cross-curricular!
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